Get Unstuck by Tapping into Your Eureka Creativity

Of course stuck only happens after you've put in an enormous amount of time and work. You've thought this through. And turned it around in your head a million times. You know this is figure-out-able.  


But you're

absolutely,

totally

stuck.  


You need a breakthrough. 


You need a Eureka moment. 


You've had them before when you've least expected.  In a flash, everything makes sense. And it feels great.


Eureka creativity starts with a certain amount of knowledge, often building on those that came before you. It's refined with research, your dogged determination, and relentless curiosity. 


When you've done all you can, and exhausted your resources, you're ready for out of the box thinking.


The great news is you can take steps to provide the opportunity for flashes of insight to arise.  And you can train your brain to make shifts in perspective a little easier.  


Sometimes you need to let go of what you think you know to uncover another possibility.  

"There is nothing like the Eureka moment, of discovering something that no one knew before" - Stephen Hawking

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IF YOURE A EUREKA CREATIVE

You and Sir Isaac Newton share this creative style.

You're well versed in a topic - you've done the research and learned the skill.  The answer to a problem appears when you let your mind rest.  Letting go allows your unconscious brain a chance to pull all the (very complex) pieces together in flashes of brilliant insight.

Key words:  cognitive, spontaneous, out of the box, determined

5 Simple Steps to Boost Your Eureka Creativity

1.  contemplate

2. let go

3.  take a walk

4.  start a dream journal

5.  be patient

A Eureka moment involves both the conscious and unconscious brain.  Sudden insight happens when your unconscious brain makes connections that our conscious can't. 

Tips:   After thinking about a challenge, give it a break to clear your mind.  Pick an activity that doesn't require important decisions.  Make it zen.  Break up thinking sessions with a variety of different activities from day to day. If you're having trouble letting go of the problem, find an activity that is active and somewhat automatic - like taking a walk.  Visualize putting the thing that's gotten you stuck in a box, then close it - it will be there for you when you need it. 

 What kinds of things do you do to take a mental break?  What helps you to really let go?

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